Labels

Labels

Abc Of Soup Making

Lean, juicy beef, mutton, and veal, form the basis of all good soups; therefore it is advisable to procure those pieces which afford the richest succulence, and such as are fresh-killed. Stale meat renders them bad, and fat is not so well adapted for making them. The principal art in composing good rich soup, is so to proportion the several ingredients that the flavour of one shall not predominate over another, and that all the articles of which it is composed, shall form an agreeable whole. To accomplish this, care must be taken that the roots and herbs are perfectly well cleaned, and that the water is proportioned to the quantity of meat and other ingredients. Generally a quart of water may be allowed to a pound of meat for soups, and half the quantity for gravies. In making soups or gravies, gentle stewing or simmering is incomparably the best. It may be remarked, however, that a really good soup can never be made but in a well-closed vessel, although, perhaps, greater wholesomeness is obtained by an occasional exposure to the air. Soups will, in general, take from three to six hours doing, and are much better prepared the day before they are wanted. When the soup is cold, the fat may be much more easily and completely removed; and when it is poured off, care must be taken not to disturb the settlings at the bottom of the vessel, which are so fine that they will escape through a sieve. A tamis is the best strainer, and if the soup is strained while it is hot, let the tamis or cloth be previously soaked in cold water. Clear soups must be perfectly transparent, and thickened soups about the consistence of cream. To thicken and give body to soups and gravies, potato-mucilage, arrow-root, bread-raspings, isinglass, flour and butter, barley, rice, or oatmeal, in a little water rubbed well together, are used. A piece of boiled beef pounded to a pulp, with a bit of butter and flour, and rubbed through a sieve, and gradually incorporated with the soup, will be found an excellent addition. When the soup appears to be too thin or too weak , the cover of the boiler should be taken off, and the contents allowed to boil till some of the watery parts have evaporated; or some of the thickening materials, above mentioned, should be added. When soups and gravies are kept from day to day in hot weather, they should be warmed up every day, and put into fresh scalded pans or tureens, and placed in a cool cellar. In temperate weather, every other day may be sufficient.

Various herbs and vegetables are required for the purpose of making soups and gravies. Of these the principal are, Scotch barley, pearl barley, wheat flour, oatmeal, bread-raspings, pease, beans, rice, vermicelli, macaroni, isinglass, potato-mucilage, mushroom or mushroom ketchup, champignons, parsnips, carrots, beetroot, turnips, garlic, shalots and onions. Sliced onions, fried with butter and flour till they are browned, and then rubbed through a sieve, are excellent to heighten the colour and flavour of brown soups and sauces, and form the basis of many of the fine relishes furnished by the cook. The older and drier the onion, the stronger will be its flavour. Leeks, cucumber, or burnet vinegar; celery or celery-seed pounded. The latter, though equally strong, does not impart the delicate sweetness of the fresh vegetable; and when used as a substitute, its flavour should be corrected by the addition of a bit of sugar. Cress-seed, parsley, common thyme, lemon thyme, orange thyme, knotted marjoram, sage, mint, winter savoury, and basil. As fresh green basil is seldom to be procured, and its fine flavour is soon lost, the best way of preserving the extract is by pouring wine on the fresh leaves.

For the seasoning of soups, bay-leaves, tomato, tarragon, chervil, burnet, allspice, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, clove, mace, black and white pepper, essence of anchovy, lemon-peel, and juice, and Seville orange-juice, are all taken. The latter imparts a finer flavour than the lemon, and the acid is much milder. These materials, with wine, mushroom ketchup, Harvey's sauce, tomato sauce, combined in various proportions, are, with other ingredients, manipulated into an almost endless variety of excellent soups and gravies. Soups, which are intended to constitute the principal part of a meal, certainly ought not to be flavoured like sauces, which are only designed to give a relish to some particular dish.
Continue Reading »

Breadmakers For Easy Baking

A bread maker is a home appliance that has revolutionized the process of making breads. First manufactured in 1986 in Japan, breadmaker since then moved its way to homes in the United States and United Kingdom. By means of a breadmaker, automatic baking has become possible and more convenient.

As with ordinary baking, ingredients must first be measured according to the recipe. The mixture is then poured into the bread pan that is placed in the machine. The breadmaker will then take some hours to bake the bread by first turning the mixture into dough and eventually baking it. The process of making dough is helped by a built-in paddle. Once the baking is done and has been allowed to cool down, the bread is then freed from the bread pan. The paddle at the bottom of the loaf should be removed from its place.

Breadmaker breads are much easier to get spoiled as compared with the commercial breads due to the absence of additives. However, it is possible that sourdough starter may be added to the ingredients to prolong the shelf life of the breads.

Breadmakers have built-in timers that may be set for easier baking. Other machines can be programmed to only prepare the dough and not to bake the bread later, in this case the dough is baked in an oven. Breadmakers have other uses as well. They may be set to make jams, pizza bases, wheat-free loaf, cakes, and pasta and in some instances, mochi- a Japanese rice bread.

Considerations in choosing a breadmaker:

- the over-all capacity of baking loafs
- the quality of bread produced
- the duration of time it takes to make one loaf
- the featured programs
- type: may either be single loaf breadmaker or multi loaf breadmaker

However, like with normal baking there may arise several problems concerning the quality of the bread produced. These may either be caused by the process of baking or the quality of breadmaker itself.

Doughy loaf

This problem basically concerns the temperature of the breadmaker. The built-in thermometer must read 190 F. Once the baking is over and the loaf is still doughy, you may choose to continue baking it in a conventional oven or wait till the breadmaker cools down and start the whole process over.

Small bread

Lack of liquid added to the dough. The problem starts with the dissolving of the yeast. If too little liquid is used, the yeast may not be stimulated to produce the necessary carbon dioxide, which is instrumental in making the dough rise. Without this, the loaf may become dense and will be much smaller.

Collapsed or flat-topped bread

Collapsing is mainly due to too much addition of liquid to the dough. The yeast in this case is overly stimulated, producing more gluten than the dough may withhold. This leads to the collapsing of loaf structure.

Bread sticking in the breadmaker pan

This can be resolved by brushing the breadmaker pan with oil before adding the water into the dough. This works well in the majority of conventional ovens as well.

Too much rising of the loaf

This problem may be controlled with the use of salt. Adding one half teaspoon of salt may be sufficient to keep the rising of the bread in balance.

One need not be an Einstein to run a simple machine such as the breadmaker. For more instruction and self-help tips, users may check the manual of the machine.
Continue Reading »

Daftar isi

Continue Reading »

Privacy policy

Privacy Policy for http://letscookingdays.blogspot.com/

If you require any more information or have any questions about our privacy policy, please feel free to contact us by email at blogtutorial.blog@gmail.com.

At http://letscookingdays.blogspot.com/, the privacy of our visitors is of extreme importance to us. This privacy policy document outlines the types of personal information is received and collected by http://letscookingdays.blogspot.com/ and how it is used.

Log Files
Like many other Web sites, http://letscookingdays.blogspot.com/ makes use of log files. The information inside the log files includes internet protocol ( IP ) addresses, type of browser, Internet Service Provider ( ISP ), date/time stamp, referring/exit pages, and number of clicks to analyze trends, administer the site, track user’s movement around the site, and gather demographic information. IP addresses, and other such information are not linked to any information that is personally identifiable.

Cookies and Web Beacons
http://letscookingdays.blogspot.com/ does use cookies to store information about visitors preferences, record user-specific information on which pages the user access or visit, customize Web page content based on visitors browser type or other information that the visitor sends via their browser.

DoubleClick DART Cookie
.:: Google, as a third party vendor, uses cookies to serve ads on http://letscookingdays.blogspot.com/.
.:: Google's use of the DART cookie enables it to serve ads to users based on their visit to http://letscookingdays.blogspot.com/ and other sites on the Internet.
.:: Users may opt out of the use of the DART cookie by visiting the Google ad and content network privacy policy at the following URL - http://www.google.com/privacy_ads.html

Some of our advertising partners may use cookies and web beacons on our site. Our advertising partners include ....
Google Adsense


These third-party ad servers or ad networks use technology to the advertisements and links that appear on http://letscookingdays.blogspot.com/ send directly to your browsers. They automatically receive your IP address when this occurs. Other technologies ( such as cookies, JavaScript, or Web Beacons ) may also be used by the third-party ad networks to measure the effectiveness of their advertisements and / or to personalize the advertising content that you see.

http://letscookingdays.blogspot.com/ has no access to or control over these cookies that are used by third-party advertisers.

You should consult the respective privacy policies of these third-party ad servers for more detailed information on their practices as well as for instructions about how to opt-out of certain practices. http://letscookingdays.blogspot.com/'s privacy policy does not apply to, and we cannot control the activities of, such other advertisers or web sites.

If you wish to disable cookies, you may do so through your individual browser options. More detailed information about cookie management with specific web browsers can be found at the browsers' respective websites.
Continue Reading »

Simple Recipe For Cooking Pork Hocks

Pork hocks are extremely delicious as they hold a strong flavor within it. If it is boiled or braised with its skin and bones on, the tasty salty tasting flavor of the meat can seep out into whatever green ingredients you are cooking it with. In fact, they can go with most vegetables and beans as the flavor from the pork hocks complements the slightly bitter taste of the vegetables and beans. If you are wondering how to cook pork hocks, here is a simple way to do it.

First of all, prepare all the vegetables you would like to serve with the pork hock. You can use any green vegetable, like celery, leek, and cabbage, or other vegetables like navy beans, carrot, and onions. Most vegetable you use will go well with pork hocks, so it is really up to you. Whichever they are, dice them up into squares, and make sure they are the same size so that they will be cooked evenly.

In the meantime, fill up a large pot with water, and add the pork hocks, black peppercorns, some salt, and vegetables into the pot. Cook it for about two to three hours over medium heat, but make sure the pork hocks are not overcooked or they will become extremely tough. After that, you can take out all the pork hocks from the boiling water, and drain out the excess water. However, do keep the gravy where the vegetables were cooked in as well as the vegetables. Then, have your oven preheated to 425?F. Using a cast iron pan greased with vegetable shortening, place the vegetables and the pork hocks on it, as well as some of the gravy made earlier onto the pan. Then, leave them to bake for half an hour. During the wait, always check to see that the gravy does dry out. Whenever it looks like it is drying out, pour more of the liquid in. You can also add some beer, or plain water mixed with salt to the gravy, depending on which you would prefer.

Once the half hour is up, check to see if the meat is thoroughly cooked. If it is cooked, then you may serve it with the vegetables and gravy on a platter. You might also want to serve it with potatoes, sauerkraut, bread, dumplings, rice, or anything at all you think might complement the dish. You may also want to strain some of the earlier cooked gravy from the pot and pour it onto a sauce plate to use as a dip. Serve them while they are still hot. This recipe one of the simpler versions on how to cook pork hocks.
Continue Reading »

Pork Hocks - The Must-have Vegetable Seasoning

Pork hocks refer to the joint area between where the foot of the hog is attached to its front leg, around the ankle area. Ham hock refers to the same area on the rear leg, but is now used rather synonymously. Pork hocks consist of mainly skin, tendons and ligaments, so when it comes to cooking pork hocks, it is best cooked for a long time through stewing or braising otherwise it will be difficult to eat it. It is often used as a seasoning as it can create a unique flavor to all sorts of vegetable-based dishes, especially with collard greens, mustard greens, green beans, navy beans, and cabbage.

In fact, it is one of the cheapest ways to season vegetables. You can just throw in a couple of pork hocks into a slow cooker with turnips, collards, kale and mustard greens, and you will find the pleasant salty taste of the pork in the slightly bitter vegetables, without even needing to add additional salt or seasoning. Other foods that pork hocks are commonly used as seasoning for are beans and peas like navy beans and black-eyed peas. Simply place some pork hocks in with the beans or peas in a crock pot for a few hours, and you will find the taste within the beans. Indeed, cooking pork hocks with vegetables and beans is favored as the flavor released from the meat seeping into the vegetable and beans creates a remarkable, complementing taste. However, be sure to keep the skin and bones attached to the pork hocks because that is where most of its flavor is present. And when it comes to serving the dishes, it is up to a person if they would like to serve the pork along with the vegetables or not, where if it is served as part of the dish, one can remove the pork hocks from the dish using a fork, discard its bone, and then put it back with the dish to be served.

Pork hocks are easy to attain as they can be bought from the butcher shop or meat department of a supermarket in different forms, such as raw or fresh, or smoked or cured. Pork hocks that are cured generally have a longer shelf life which makes storing them or use over a period of time possible. However, because there is not much flavour left from the pork after one round of cooking, it is recommended that it is only used once for cooking.
Continue Reading »